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p. 140 p. 141


In the north, it is said, there were many first people. One house was full of people, and they went hunting. One man went off and did not return by night. Then next day his brother went to look for him. And he went off, going along the ridge; and in the morning, again he had not come back. Then again some one went to look for him; and he, not returning, they ceased (going off).

"I don't know what is the trouble! I again (also) will go and look for him," said one. And he, in the morning, after he had had his breakfast and made ready his bow, went off. And he did not return. "What can be the trouble?" said one. "Do you go and look for him, taking good care." Then (another) went.

Again he did not come back. "They are trying to destroy us," they said; and again one went to search, and did not return at night. Then, "You must be careful," said his father. Again one went off, and did not return at night. The people were half gone.

"Do the best you can, live through it," said he. "Whatever can be the trouble? I will go and see," he said. "If I do not get back, do the best you can, ye people. What can be the trouble? While we are out hunting for food, for game, (some one) I don't know who it is, sees us, and troubles us. What man can it be?" he said.

So he went off, and did not return. Another one went off afterwards, and he also did not return. Then the old man said, "I will go last. Do you go first," said he. So the last and only one left alive went. And at night again he was not apparent. Then again the old man went. "Do ye stay," said he. "Don't let the child run about." So (the latter) and his elder sister staid there. The old

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man did not come back. Then they two remained there alone. "You must remain without crawling outside," said she. "What is it that is destroying us people? Do you know "Do not go out! You must play about close by here, not going far away," said she. Then be replied, "Very well."

Then she said, "Bring some wood!" and he went to bring it. By and by he brought some back. He carried a large piece, although he was small, he carried a large piece. She sent him again. "You must not carry a large piece! It might hurt you," she said,

Then he went for wood. "Do not go far," she said. But he went a little farther, and brought back a very large, very pitchy (log). "Didn't I tell you not to carry (such a large one)?" said she. "You might hurt yourself in the chest. That is what I told you," she said.

He had big eyes, they say; and, "Although (I am) small, I am going to see," he thought. "What, I wonder, does this!" he said. "Look here, my sister! I want to go and look."--"I have told you not to say such things," she said. Next morning she sent him to get wood, and he went. He brought back a pitch stump, a whole one. Then, "I wonder how it is that carrying such loads . . .," thought his sister. "Although he is indeed very small, (yet) he carries great loads," she thought,

Next morning he went off. He went, going along the ridge, and came to a great flat place. And human bones were many there. Standing there, he looked all about. By and by a man approached. "What are you doing?" said he. "Nothing," (the boy) replied. "Do you want to fight?" said he. "Yes," said the boy. Thereupon they two wrestled, and the boy killed Lizard-Man.

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Thereupon he returned, and arrived at the house. He bathed in warm water, and then spoke. "I am going off above," said he. "You must remain, you must stay here. Rising from here, I shall go over up to the Above-Valley; and when I reach there, I will thunder," said he. "I shall roar, and you shall hear me."

Whereupon, having finished speaking to his sister, he started and went off. And a while after he had gone, it thundered. He was roaring, they say. He it was who was to be the Thunder-Man. His sister recognized him again. At that time he said, "I shall have my country there. You must remain here. Meanwhile I shall be continually travelling about in the Above-Valley." So he spoke. That is all. "There are many squinting women gathering tules." 1


145:1 This is a common way of ending a tale. The sentence has no application to the rest of the story.

Next: 7. Thunder-Boy and Lizard-Man (variant)