Sacred Texts  Christianity  Early Church Fathers  Index  Previous  Next 

Chapter XXIX.—Consecration of the Church of Jerusalem.—Banishment of St. Athanasius.

All the bishops who were present at the council of Tyre, with all others from every quarter, were commanded by the emperor to proceed to Ælia 439 to consecrate the churches which he had there erected. The emperor despatched also a number of officials of the most kindly disposition, remarkable for piety and fidelity, whom he ordered to furnish abundant supplies of provisions, not only to the bishops and their followers, but to the vast multitudes who flocked from all parts to Jerusalem. The holy altar was decorated with imperial hangings and with golden vessels set with gems. When the splendid festival was concluded, each bishop returned to his own diocese. The emperor was highly gratified when informed of the splendour and magnificence of the function, and blessed the Author of all good for having thus granted his petition.

Athanasius having complained of his unjust condemnation, the emperor commanded the bishops against whom this complaint was directed to present themselves at court. Upon their arrival, they desisted from urging any of their former calumnies, because they knew how clearly they could be refuted; but they made it appear that Athanasius had threatened to prevent the exportation of corn. The emperor believed what they said, and banished him to a city of Gaul called Treves 440 . This occurred in the thirtieth year of the emperor’s reign 441 .



Ælia Capitolina, the name given to Jerusalem on its restoration by (Ælius) Hadrianus.


Augusta Treverorum, Treveri, Trier, or Treves, on the Moselle, was now the official Capital of Gaul.


i.e. a.d. 336.

Next: Will of the blessed Emperor Constantine.