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Chapter XVIII.—Peter’s Speech Continued.

“Much better is it if you will take her by the hand and come, in order that you yourself may become chaste; for you will desire to become chaste, that you may experience the full fruition of a holy marriage, and you will not scruple, if you desire it, to become a father, 1184 to love your own children, and to be loved by your own children.  He who wishes to have a chaste wife is also himself chaste, gives her what is due to a wife, takes his meals with her, keeps company with her, goes with her to the word that makes chaste, does not grieve her, does not rashly quarrel with her, does not make himself hateful to her, furnishes her with all the good things he can, and when he has them not, he makes up the deficiency by caresses.  The chaste wife does not expect to be caressed, recognises her husband as her lord, bears his poverty when he is poor, is hungry with him when he is hungry, travels with him when he travels, consoles him when he is grieved, and if she have a large 1185 dowry, is subject to him as if she had nothing at all.  But if the husband have a poor wife, let him reckon her chastity a great dowry.  The chaste wife is temperate in her eating and drinking, in order that the weariness of the body, thus pampered, may not drag the soul down to unlawful desires.  Moreover, she never assuredly remains alone with young men, and she suspects 1186 the old; she turns away from disorderly laughter, gives herself up to God alone; she is not led astray; she delights in listening to holy words, but turns away from those which are not spoken to produce chastity.



There seems to be some corruption in this clause.  Literally, it is, “and you will not scruple, if you love, I mean, to become a father.”


Lit., “larger” than usual.


ὑποπτεύει.  The Latin translator and Lehmann render “respects” or “reveres.”

Next: Chapter XIX