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How Sir Galahad fought with Sir Tristram, and how Sir
Tristram yielded him and promised to fellowship with Launcelot.

THEN came Sir Galahad, and the King with the Hundred Knights with
him; and this Sir Galahad proffered to fight with Sir Tristram
hand for hand.  And so they made them ready to go unto battle on
horseback with great courage.  Then Sir Galahad and Sir Tristram
met together so hard that either bare other down, horse and all,
to the earth.  And then they avoided their horses as noble
knights, and dressed their shields, and drew their swords with
ire and rancour, and they lashed together many sad strokes, and
one while striking, another while foining, tracing and traversing
as noble knights; thus they fought long, near half a day, and
either were sore wounded.  At the last Sir Tristram waxed light
and big, and doubled his strokes, and drove Sir Galahad aback on
the one side and on the other, so that he was like to have been

With that came the King with the Hundred Knights, and all that
fellowship went fiercely upon Sir Tristram.  When Sir Tristram
saw them coming upon him, then he wist well he might not endure. 
Then as a wise knight of war, he said to Sir Galahad, the haut
prince:  Sir, ye show to me no knighthood, for to suffer all your
men to have ado with me all at once; and as meseemeth ye be a
noble knight of your hands it is great shame to you.  So God me
help, said Sir Galahad, there is none other way but thou must
yield thee to me, other else to die, said Sir Galahad to Sir
Tristram.  I will rather yield me to you than die for that is
more for the might of your men than of your hands.  And
therewithal Sir Tristram took his own sword by the point, and put
the pommel in the hand of Sir Galahad.

Therewithal came the King with the Hundred Knights, <324>and hard
began to assail Sir Tristram.  Let be, said Sir Galahad, be ye
not so hardy to touch him, for I have given this knight his life. 
That is your shame, said the King with the Hundred Knights; hath
he not slain your father and your mother?  As for that, said Sir
Galahad, I may not wite him greatly, for my father had him in
prison, and enforced him to do battle with him; and my father had
such a custom that was a shameful custom, that what knight came
there to ask harbour his lady must needs die but if she were
fairer than my mother; and if my father overcame that knight he
must needs die.  This was a shameful custom and usage, a knight
for his harbour-asking to have such harbourage.  And for this
custom I would never draw about him.  So God me help, said the
King, this was a shameful custom.  Truly, said Sir Galahad, so
seemed me; and meseemed it had been great pity that this knight
should have been slain, for I dare say he is the noblest man that
beareth life, but if it were Sir Launcelot du Lake.  Now, fair
knight, said Sir Galahad, I require thee tell me thy name, and of
whence thou art, and whither thou wilt.  Sir, he said, my name is
Sir Tristram de Liones, and from King Mark of Cornwall I was sent
on message unto King Anguish of Ireland, for to fetch his
daughter to be his wife, and here she is ready to go with me into
Cornwall, and her name is La Beale Isoud.  And, Sir Tristram,
said Sir Galahad, the haut prince, well be ye found in these
marches, and so ye will promise me to go unto Sir Launcelot du
Lake, and accompany with him, ye shall go where ye will, and your
fair lady with you; and I shall promise you never in all my days
shall such customs be used in this castle as have been used. 
Sir, said Sir Tristram, now I let you wit, so God me help, I
weened ye had been Sir Launcelot du Lake when I saw you first,
and therefore I dread you the more; and sir, I promise you, said
Sir Tristram, as soon as I may I will see Sir Launcelot and
infellowship me with him; for of all the knights of the world I
most desire his fellowship.