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Chapter VI.—Peter’s Frugality.

Then Peter, hearing, smiled and said, “What think you, then, O Clement?  Do you not think that you are placed by very necessity in the position of my servant?  For who else shall take care of those many splendid tunics, with all my changes of rings and sandals?  And who shall make ready those pleasant and artistic dainties, which, being so various, need many skilful cooks, and all those things which are procured with great eagerness, and are prepared for the appetite of effeminate men as for some great wild beast?  However, such a choice has occurred to you, perhaps, without you understanding or knowing my manner of life, that I use only bread and olives, and rarely pot-herbs; and that this is my only coat and cloak which I wear; and I have no need of any of them, nor of aught else:  for even in these I abound.  For my mind, seeing all the eternal good things that are there, regards none of the things that are here.  However, I accept of your good will; and I admire and commend you, for that you, a man of refined habits, have so easily submitted your manner of living to your necessities.  For we, from our childhood, both I and Andrew, my brother, who is also my brother as respects God, not only being brought up in the condition of orphans, but also accustomed to labour through poverty and misfortune, easily bear the discomforts of our present journeys.  Whence, if you would obey me, you would allow me, a working man, to fulfil the part of a servant to you.”

Next: Chapter VII