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Chapter XXIX.—Fire-Worship of the Persians.

“First among whom is named a certain king Nimrod, the magic art having been handed down to him as by a flash, whom the Greeks, also called Ninus, and from whom the city of Nineveh took its name.  Thus, therefore, diverse and erratic superstitions took their beginning from the magic art.  For, because it was difficult to draw away the human race from the love of God, and attach them to deaf and lifeless images, the magicians made use of higher efforts, that men might be turned to erratic worship, by signs among the stars, and motions brought down as it were from heaven, and by the will of God.  And those who had been first deceived, collecting the ashes of Zoroaster,—who, as we have said, was burnt up by the indignation of the demon, to whom he had been too troublesome,—brought them to the Persians, that they might be preserved by them with perpetual watching, as divine fire fallen from heaven, and might be worshipped as a heavenly God.

Next: Chapter XXX