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Chapter LXXII.—The Remedy.

“For these unclean spirits love to dwell in the bodies of men, that they may fulfil their own desires by their service, and, inclining the motions of their souls to those things which they themselves desire, may compel them to obey their own lusts, that they may become wholly vessels of demons. 673   One of whom is this Simon, who is seized with such disease, and cannot now be healed, because he is sick in his will and purpose.  Nor does the demon dwell in him against his will; and therefore, if any one would drive it out of him, since it is inseparable from himself, and, so to speak, has now become his very soul, he should seem rather to kill him, and to incur the guilt of manslaughter.  Let no one of you therefore be saddened at being separated from eating with us, for every one ought to observe that it is for just so long a time as he p. 117 pleases.  For he who wishes soon to be baptized is separated but for a little time, but he for a longer who wishes to be baptized later.  Every one therefore has it in his own power to demand a shorter or a longer time for his repentance; and therefore it lies with you, when you wish it, to come to our table; and not with us, who are not permitted to take food with any one who has not been baptized.  It is rather you, therefore, who hinder us from eating with you, if you interpose delays in the way of your purification, and defer your baptism.”  Having said thus, and having blessed, he took food.  And afterwards, when he had given thanks to God, he went into the house and went to bed; and we all did the like, for it was now night.




[On the demonology of this work see book iv. 15–19; comp. Homily IX. 8–22.—R.]

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