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The Book of Poetry, tr. by James Legge, [1876], at

p. 158


The Tsê P‘o; allusive. A gentleman's admiration of and longing for a certain lady.

1There where its shores the marsh surround,
Rushes and lotus plants abound.
Their loveliness brings to my mind
The lovelier one that I would find.
In vain I try to ease the smart
Of wounded love that wrings my heart.
In waking thought and likely dreams,
From every pore the water streams.

2All round the marsh's shores are seen
Valerian flowers and rushes green.
But lovelier is that Beauty rare,
Handsome and large, and tall, and fair.
I wish and long to call her mine,
Doomed with the longing still to pine.
Nor day nor night e’er brings relief;
My inmost heart is full of grief.

3Around the marsh, in rich display,
Grow rush and lotus flowers, all gay. p. 159
But not with her do they compare,
So tall and large, majestic, fair.
Both day and night, I nothing speed;
Still clings to me the aching need.
On side, on back, on face, I lie,
But vain each change of posture try.

Next: I. Kao Ch‘iu